In a paper published today in Nature Communications, an international group of collaborators led by researchers at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh have identified a genetic cause of a rare neurological disorder marked by developmental delay and loss of coordination, or ataxia. The disorder, scientists found, is caused by mutations in a protein called GEMIN5–one
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Nursing your baby can feel like the Mount Everest of early parenthood, but many moms agree it gets better with time. Between latching and tongue-ties, too much milk or not enough, engorgement and leakage, and will-breastfeeding-make-my-boobs-sag worries, there was no shortage of breastfeeding questions among the new moms I’ve talked to. Some sobbed through cracked
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Every exhausted new mom wants to know when the endless night time wakings will end. Here, a sleep expert weighs in. I don’t know a single parent who’s never googled about baby sleep, and anyone who says they haven’t is probably lying. We all want to know how much our babies should be getting, if
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Some babies just need to cry, but the good news is it won’t last forever. Here’s how to tell if your baby’s tears are the colicky kind. Colic is typically defined as full-force crying for at least three hours per day, on at least three days per week, for at least three weeks. But lots
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A new University of Iowa study challenges the idea that gray matter (the neurons that form the cerebral cortex) is more important than white matter (the myelin covered axons that physically connect neuronal regions) when it comes to cognitive health and function. The findings may help neurologists better predict the long-term effects of strokes and
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Neonatal hypothermia — which occurs when an infant’s core body temperature falls below the normal range needed to maintain health — contributes to approximately one million deaths each year, and countless cases of stunted growth, almost exclusively in low- and middle-income countries. To address this common but preventable condition, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, engineers
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image: iStockphoto IN THIS ARTICLE Parents will meticulously take care of their little ones, from their food and milestones to their poop. A newborn’s poop first poop is usually black and is known as meconium. For babies, black stools typically appear in the first few days after birth (1). The color of your baby’s stool
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Some changes are temporary while others may settle in for the long run. Here’s when you should actually worry (or even change doctors). When you’re pregnant and imagining the days and weeks after the birth, you tend to focus on your baby, not so much your own body and recovery. Maybe that’s why so many
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A new USC study suggests that certain neighborhoods – particularly those characterized by poverty and unemployment – may pose an environmental risk to the developing brains of children, impacting neurocognitive performance and even brain size. The research was published May 3 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. These findings highlight the importance of neighborhood environments for
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A state of the art plenary session during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2021 Virtual Meeting discussed prenatal environmental contaminants and childhood disease, and the latest evidence for epigenetic mechanisms associated with transgenerational disease and public policy implications. Three generational animal models now conclusively demonstrate that fetal exposure to the same environmental chemicals now found
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Very often, we find ourselves trying to repair or fix something at home with no real idea of what we’re doing or how we should do it. Today’s video is especially for everyone who has ever been in that position before. The first repair hack you will learn is how to fix a broken hammer
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