Month: October 2020

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 19 2020 A multisite study led by UC Davis Health found that two prominent early intervention models for autism had a similar impact. The researchers compared developmental and symptom improvements in toddlers with autism who received one year of one-on-one intervention sessions using either the Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI)
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 19 2020 Like a cold front that moves in, setting the stage for severe weather, coronavirus infection triggers showers of infection-fighting immune molecules – showers that sometimes escalate into a chaotic immune response known as a cytokine storm. About 20 to 30 percent of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 develop severe
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Babies do have kneecaps, but these are not bony yet and are made of a rubbery material called cartilage. According to a post by Dr. Edward Gotlied, a pediatric specialist in the Stone Mountain area, Georgia, newborns have kneecaps, also known as the patella. They usually form at about the
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 19 2020 Adults and children born with heart defects had a lower-than-expected risk of developing moderate or severe COVID-19 symptoms, finds a study of more than 7,000 patients from the congenital heart disease center at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. Throughout the course of the pandemic, evidence
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 19 2020 Elevated birth weight is linked with developing atrial fibrillation later in life, according to research presented at the 31st Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC). GW-ICC 2020 is a virtual meeting during 19 to 25 October. Faculty from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) will participate in
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Onion is one of the most commonly cultivated vegetables worldwide. It is available in different varieties and is classified based on its skin color (red, white, brown, or yellow), taste (sweet or pungent), or shape (round, flat, or globe) (1). The vegetable adds flavor and texture to food preparations, while its phytochemical profile benefits health
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 15 2020 New parents who receive attentive, supportive nursing care during labor and immediately after childbirth are more likely to exclusively breastfeed their newborn when leaving the hospital, finds a study published in MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. Nurses make substantial, often unrecognized, contributions to public health during
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Hello friends! You won’t believe what you’re going to be learning today. Are you ready for it? First of all, we’re going to show you how to remove a marker stain from your desk easily. You don’t want to get in trouble because of that! Right after that, we’re going to show you how to
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 16 2020 E-cigarettes might not be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, according to the first known study into the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on babies. Psychologists at Durham University, UK, found that babies of mothers who smoked e-cigarettes during pregnancy displayed similar abnormal reflexes to infants whose
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 16 2020 A patient with end-stage and rapidly progressing soft-tissue cancer whose tumor did not respond to standard treatment, had a “rapid and complete response” to a novel combination of immunotherapy, according to new research published by a team of scientists from John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 16 2020 Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect in the United States, occurring in approximately one in every 100 babies. However, hospital data regarding short- and long-term outcomes for patients has been limited and oftentimes difficult to access and/or interpret. “Children’s Hospital Colorado has long been
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