Month: April 2021

SolStock via Getty ImagesOnly-child families are on the rise, but parents say their choices are still looked down on. Brenda Seltzer was still in the hospital, having just delivered her son, when her family started asking when she was going to have another one. “Everybody was like, ‘How long are you going to wait until
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After more than a year of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, it has become clear that children are less susceptible to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), both in terms of the number of infections and the severity of illness. However, some children do develop severe disease as well as a host
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Weight loss is a broad term that encompasses loss of total body mass, i.e., fluid, fat, and muscle mass. It can be intentional or unintentional. Intentional weight loss means planned weight loss under pediatric guidance to manage weight in overweight or obese children. On the other hand, unintentional weight loss
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE ‘What’s in a name?’ is an expression in popular parlance, but we know well enough the effect one’s name has on people. When someone has an exotic or foreign-sounding name, which is also difficult to pronounce, it piques the curiosity. It can also be a conversation starter in many situations,
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Researchers have created a new, open-access tool that allows doctors and scientists to evaluate infant brain health by assessing the concentration of various chemical markers, called metabolites, in the brain. The tool compiled data from 140 infants to determine normal ranges for these metabolites. Published in the journal NMR in Biomedicine, the study describes an
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Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Public Health Agency of Sweden have studied newborn babies whose mothers tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy or childbirth. The results show that although babies born of test-positive mothers are more likely to be born early, extremely few were infected with COVID-19. The study, which is published in the
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Using ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map the brains of people with Down syndrome (DS), researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals and other institutions detected subtle differences in the structure and function of the hippocampus–a region of the brain tied to memory and learning. Such detailed mapping, made possible
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“Dirty 30.” “Thirty, flirty and thriving.” There are many quippy ways to describe this significant decade. But perhaps the best descriptions of this stage of life come from the funny and relentlessly honest folks on Twitter. Whether you’re getting stoked about home decor or feeling the pain of hangovers more than ever before, this time
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Children love to play and are curious to explore new things. They also start developing cognitively from a young age (1). Exposing them to different activities will help them play and learn at the same time. Several childhood activities enhance various skills in children. All you need to do is
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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered one way in which SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, hijacks human cell machinery to blunt the immune response, allowing it to establish infection, replicate and cause disease. In short, the virus’ genome gets tagged with a special marker by a human enzyme
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Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental condition that involves challenges in social interaction, nonverbal communication, speech, and repetitive behaviors. In the United States alone, about 1 in 54 children is diagnosed with ASD. Boys are four times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than girls. Early diagnosis is crucial for treatment and
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For the first time in published literature, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) researchers showed that a variety of white blood cells known as eosinophils modify the respiratory barrier during influenza A (IAV) infection, according to a recent paper in the journal Cells. This research could have implications in
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