Month: June 2021

Younger patients, including adolescents, are less likely to suffer severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. This is the case even though the risk of infection with its causative pathogen – the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) – is not necessarily reduced in this age group. This has led to the supposition that stronger
0 Comments
DIY TOYS AND OTHER SOCKS HACKS AND CRAFTS What can be more simple than socks? However, apart of their simplicity, they can actually be very interesting. You can do a lot of awesome crafts with socks. Add a little bit of simple sewing skills, and you’re already a master of socks upcycling! Let’s go! If
0 Comments
We’ve got a new Gerber baby on the scene. On Monday, the baby food brand announced the winner of its 11th annual Gerber Baby Photo Search contest: a 4-month-old named Zane Kahin from Winter Park, Florida. A panel of judges selected Zane out of more than 90,000 entrants to be the 2021 Gerber “spokesbaby.” Zane
0 Comments
Ten IU School of Medicine researchers out of a team of 11 scientists, are responsible for the findings of a new study they conducted to investigate alternative ways to treat kidney infections. Their work, which is published in the high-quality research journal Nature Communications, examined how to utilize the kidneys’ own internal infection fighting capabilities
0 Comments
When being short is normal Take a peek into a preschool class and you’ll see a wide range of heights, but chances are, most children are perfectly within normal range. “When you look at a growth curve, the 50th percentile means if you have 100 kids, 50 kids would be taller than that line and
0 Comments
International organizations and countries around the world are working to eliminate HIV/AIDS by 2030. To reach this goal, new approaches are needed–particularly among difficult-to-reach groups such as people who inject drugs (PWID), who are 30 times more likely to contract HIV/AIDS compared with the general population. Matthew Akiyama, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Albert
0 Comments
It was a nagging mystery: A rare-disease expert at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh had found a successful treatment for two of the deadliest symptoms of one of the more common classes of rare diseases diagnosed by newborn screenings, but one symptom–painful episodes of muscle breakdown that land victims in intensive care–persisted. Today, the scientists
0 Comments
A gene variant that lowers white blood cell levels and is common in individuals with African ancestry contributes to unnecessary bone marrow biopsies, according to a study published June 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The findings from three institutions, led by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, provide an example of how using genetic data
0 Comments
Parents of children with the most complex medical conditions are more likely to report poor or fair mental health and struggle to find community help, according to a study completed by researchers at University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) and Golisano Children’s Hospital. The study was published in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy
0 Comments
Social distancing measures in public places decrease the risk of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. However, while social distancing may be effective in public places, people who live in overcrowded or multigenerational households are at a higher risk of exposure. Researchers at the Weill
0 Comments
Liza Makowski, PhD, professor in the Department of Medicine and the UTHSC Center for Cancer Research, has long been interested in how the immune system is altered by obesity and how this impacts cancer risk and treatment. “Obesity is complex, because it can cause both inflammation and activate counter-inflammation pathways leading to immunosuppression,” Dr. Makowski
0 Comments
Despite research showing associations between anabolic steroid use and criminal offending, the possibility of a similar association between legal performance-enhancing substance use, such as creatine, and criminal offending remained unknown. A new study published online in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence now shows that both forms of performance-enhancing substance use is longitudinally associated with
0 Comments