Children’s Health

The list of known genetic mitochondrial disorders is ever-growing, and ongoing research continues to identify new disorders in this category. In an article recently published in Brain, a Japanese-European team of scientists, including researchers from Fujita Health University, describe mutations in the LIG3 gene, which plays a crucial role in mitochondrial DNA replication. These mutations
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A Keele researcher will embark on a two-year study to identify affordable treatments to help children living with spinal muscular atrophy. Dr Melissa Bowerman, of Keele University’s School of Medicine, has been awarded £99,959 by theAcademy of Medical Science’s Springboard grant schemeto continue her research into treatments for the devastating childhood disease. To undertake the
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Patients who have preexisting respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and live in areas with high levels of air pollution have a greater chance of hospitalization if they contract COVID-19, says a University of Cincinnati researcher. Angelico Mendy, MD, PhD, assistant professor of environmental and public health sciences, at the
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With summer around the corner, a project shows how implementing an evidence-based mindfulness program in a summer camp setting decreases emotional distress in school age children and empowers campers and counselors alike – enhancing camper-counselor relationships. Mindfulness – a state of consciousness that fosters awareness – has the potential to help regulate emotions and behaviors.
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A preclinical study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center shows an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeting surface protein MT1-MMP can act as a guided missile in eradicating osteosarcoma tumor cells without damaging normal tissues. This technology, using precision therapy targeting of cell-surface proteins through a Bicycle toxin conjugate (BTC), shows
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Initial clinical trials for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines excluded pregnant women. Thus, pregnant women’s immune response to vaccination and the transplacental transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus is not yet studied in detail. Recently, a group of researchers analyzed 122 pregnant women and their neonates at the time of birth.
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An adaptive cognitive training program could help treat attention and working memory difficulties in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), a new study published in the of Journal of Pediatric Psychology shows. These neurocognitive difficulties have practical implications for the 100,000 individuals in the U.S. with SCD, as 20-40% of youth with SCD repeat a
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Children may not be as infectious in spreading SARS-CoV-2 to others as previously thought, according to new University of Manitoba-led research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Our findings have important public health and clinical implications. If younger children are less capable of transmitting infectious virus, daycare, in-person school and cautious extracurricular activities may be
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As the current pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues, the pace of research on a vaccine to the virus responsible, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been intense, leading to the accelerated release of several vaccines candidates. A new study, released on the medRxiv* preprint server, shows the correlation between serum
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Susana R. Patton, Ph.D., ABPP, CDCES Center Director of the Nemours Center for Healthcare Delivery Science in Florida, has secured a three-year, $900,000 NIH R01 grant entitled, “Coin2Dose: Behavioral economics to promote insulin bolus activity and improve HbA1c in teens.” Dr. Patton is the recipient of three concurrent R01 grants. Together with her Nemours co-investigator,
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Nursing mothers who receive a COVID-19 vaccine may pass protective antibodies to their babies through breast milk for at least 80 days following vaccination, suggests new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Our study showed a huge boost in antibodies against the COVID-19 virus in breast milk starting two weeks after
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